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A prime is a positive integer X that has exactly two distinct divisors: 1 and X. The first few prime integers are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13.

A prime D is called a prime divisor of a positive integer P if there exists a positive integer K such that D * K = P. For example, 2 and 5 are prime divisors of 20.

You are given two positive integers N and M. The goal is to check whether the sets of prime divisors of integers N and M are exactly the same.

For example, given:

N = 15 and M = 75, the prime divisors are the same: {3, 5};
N = 10 and M = 30, the prime divisors aren’t the same: {2, 5} is not equal to {2, 3, 5};
N = 9 and M = 5, the prime divisors aren’t the same: {3} is not equal to {5}.
Write a function:

function solution(A, B);

that, given two non-empty zero-indexed arrays A and B of Z integers, returns the number of positions K for which the prime divisors of A[K] and B[K] are exactly the same.

For example, given:

A[0] = 15 B[0] = 75
A[1] = 10 B[1] = 30
A[2] = 3 B[2] = 5
the function should return 1, because only one pair (15, 75) has the same set of prime divisors.

Assume that:

Z is an integer within the range [1..6,000];
each element of arrays A, B is an integer within the range [1..2,147,483,647].
Complexity:

expected worst-case time complexity is O(Z*log(max(A)+max(B))2);
expected worst-case space complexity is O(1), beyond input storage (not counting the storage required for input arguments).
Elements of input arrays can be modified.