AlgorithmsCodilityPatternsTutorials

First let’s construct an object named count, containing our numbers as keys, and number of their occurrences as values. It’s a simple optimization that can save us a lot of processing power.

Next, for each key, let’s find the number of divisors, and then simply subtract that number from the length of our initial array.

You are given a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers.

For each number A[i] such that 0 ≤ i < N, we want to count the number of elements of the array that are not the divisors of A[i]. We say that these elements are non-divisors.

For example, consider integer N = 5 and array A such that:

A[0] = 3
A[1] = 1
A[2] = 2
A[3] = 3
A[4] = 6
For the following elements:

A[0] = 3, the non-divisors are: 2, 6,
A[1] = 1, the non-divisors are: 3, 2, 3, 6,
A[2] = 2, the non-divisors are: 3, 3, 6,
A[3] = 3, the non-divisors are: 2, 6,
A[6] = 6, there aren’t any non-divisors.
Write a function:

function solution(A);

that, given a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers, returns a sequence of integers representing the amount of non-divisors.

The sequence should be returned as:

a structure Results (in C), or
a vector of integers (in C++), or
a record Results (in Pascal), or
an array of integers (in any other programming language).
For example, given:

A[0] = 3
A[1] = 1
A[2] = 2
A[3] = 3
A[4] = 6
the function should return [2, 4, 3, 2, 0], as explained above.

Assume that:

N is an integer within the range [1..50,000];
each element of array A is an integer within the range [1..2 * N].
Complexity:

expected worst-case time complexity is O(N*log(N));
expected worst-case space complexity is O(N), beyond input storage (not counting the storage required for input arguments).
Elements of input arrays can be modified.